Family Class Sponsorship

Sponsor your spouse, congugal partner, children and grand parents to Canada.

Overview

Request information from an immigration consultant on sponsoring your family members to immigrate to Canada. This process, naturally, begins before you arrive in Canada because you will want to make sure that you identify and disclose all (and potential) family members before your arrival in Canada. Once here, you will want to speak to an immigration consultant to determine both your personal and financial responsibilities related to sponsoring family members.

As a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, you may sponsor a member of the family class to live in Canada as a permanent resident. Importantly, you may speak with an immigration consultant to determine the nature of undertakings related to sponsoring your spouse, common-law partner, or dependent child.

Find brief answers to questions on sponsoring family members. your immigration consultant can work with you to ensure that you meet the legal requirements for family immigration.

What are the requirements for sponsoring members of the family class?

To sponsor a family member, you need to be a permanent resident or citizen of Canada who is 18 years or older and lives in Canada. If you do not live in Canada, you may sponsor your spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner or dependent child (who has no children), if you intend to reside in Canada when they become permanent residents. Your immigration consultant will work with you to ensure that you meet the requirements for family sponsorship.

Importantly, if you arrived in Canada due to a sponsorship undertaking, you may not then sponsor a (new) spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner whom you may feel a desire to be with until after 5 years. your immigration consultant can help you to understand the consequences of having been sponsored, and later wanting to sponsor another party.

Who can you sponsor?

You can sponsor family members who have one of the following relationships to you: the person is your spouse, common-law partner, dependent child, parent or grandparent. You may also sponsor your sibling or a grandchild who is under 18 and who is not the spouse or common-law partner of another person. Importantly, you need to understand how each relationship is defined:

  • common-law partner is a person who has lived with you in a conjugal (or married like relationship) for at least 1 year;
  • conjugal partner is a person who is living outside Canada and has been in a conjugal relationship with you for at least 1 year;
  • dependent child is your biological child or is a child who was legally adopted by yourself, your spouse or common-law partner, and
    • is less than 22 years old and not a spouse or common-law partner of another person, or
    • is 22 years or older and has depended on their parent for financial support before becoming 22 and is unable to support
      herself or himself financially due to a physical or mental condition

    Your immigration consultant can help you to walk through the various legal definitions for family sponsorship.

    How long are you responsible for the family member you sponsor?

    The length of your responsibility for the person whom you sponsor depends on how they are related to you, as follows:

    • if the person being sponsored is your spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner, your responsibility ends
      for that person ends on the last day of the period that is 3 years following the day he or she became a permanent resident;
    • if the person being sponsored is your child (or a child of your spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner),
      your responsibility ends on whichever comes first: 1) 10 years after the day your child becomes a permanent resident; or
      2) on the day the child reaches age 25.
    • if the person being sponsored is your parent, grandparent or they are accompanying you, your responsibility ends
      20 years following the day they become permanent residents.
    • if the person you are sponsoring derives from any other family relationship, your responsibility ends 10 years after the day
      that person becomes a permanent resident

    Meet with an immigration consultant to discuss your undertakings (or responsibilities) when sponsoring children, parents, grand parents and spouses.

    What is an Undertaking?

    As a sponsor, you are placed under an undertaking are responsible for “every” social assistance benefit used by the person whom you sponsor.

    If you have no family in Canada, can you sponsor a relative to immigrate to Canada?

    If you, the sponsor, do not have any family members (such as a spouse,
    common-law partner, conjugal partner, child, parent, sibling, nephew or niece, aunt or uncle) or a relative in Canada who is a Canadian Citizen or permanent resident, you may sponsor any relative (who is related to you by blood) to immigrate to Canada.

    Importantly, as their sponsor, you will be placed under an undertaking and remain financially liable for that person even if they, later, do not feel a desire to communicate with you while in Canada. Your immigration consultant can listen to your concerns and provide advice that offers a solution to your problem.

    Who cannot be sponsored?

    You should speak with an immigration consultant to determine the situations where you cannot sponsor an individual:

    • if when you applied to become a permanent resident, you did not disclose (or are found to have withheld) the identity of a family member
      whom you intend to later sponsor;
    • if you or the person being sponsored were advised to appear for examination and neither of you appeared;
    • if your spouse was living separate and apart from you and was not examined
    • if your spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner are under 18 years old;
    • if when you were married, either you or your spouse were not present at the wedding;
    • if you have an existing undertaking, which has not expired with a former spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner, and you intend to sponsor a
      (new) spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner;
    • if when you were married, either you or your spouse were the common-law partner of another person;
    • if you or the person you want to sponsor are the common-law partner or conjugal partner of another person, and you have lived
      separate and apart from each other for at least 1 year; or
    • if the person you want to sponsor is your spouse, and either of you (or both) did not attend the wedding ceremony.
    Speaking with an immigration consultant can be your best choice. We offer honest, fair advice on sponsoring members of the family class.

    Request a Free Immigration Consultation!